Archive for the 'Tenant' Category



Always Cut Your Commission!

Yeah, that’s right!   “Always Cut Your Commission!”  And, why not?  If the only value you can offer your clients is your price, then you probably will have to cut your commissions to stay in business!

Actually, let’s clarify what is often referred to as “Commission Cutting.”  It simply means that one broker is willing to sell his or her services at a lower rate than he or she would for other projects, or perhaps in comparison to his or her competitors.  So what?  Does that mean every one in the local market must sell their services at the same price?  If you buy shoes from one store at a low price, does that mean that all of the other shoe stores will lose all of their customers and go out of business, just because you got a good deal?

Just like in other industries, there exist many common practices in commercial real estate, including those surrounding broker compensation.  But, no “standard” compensation or commission structure exists.  In fact, in most states, setting commission standards is considered price-fixing, and is illegal!

So, what’s all this noise about brokers who cut their commissions and how that supposedly affects the compensation of other brokers?  The response I often hear is that if one broker offers low-priced services then every landlord, tenant, buyer, and seller in that market will make the same demands.  Really?  Well, guess what?  They already want your services at the lowest possible price.  Shouldn’t they?  Don’t you want to buy those shoes as inexpensively as possible?  Don’t you negotiate for a lower price when you buy or lease a car?  Didn’t you negotiate when you bought your home?  Did everyone else get their home for the same price you did?  Of course not!  Seeking a lower price is the American way, and there isn’t a darned thing wrong with it.

Ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you a low-cost service provider?
  • Is low-cost always the winner?

NO!  If that were true, there would not exist high-priced hotels, restaurants, resorts, clothes, homes, cars, etc., etc., etc., or anything of better quality.  If low price always won, consumers and businesses would never buy the best quality or engage the best of any service provider.  Instead, they would only hire the cheapest.  And, in those instances, they’d get what they paid for.

Forget what other brokers do.  There is plenty of room in every industry for low-cost service providers, because some clients do make purchasing and hiring decisions purely on cost.  Low cost, almost always means low quality, and those who hire only on a low-cost basis typically receive services commensurate with what they pay.  And, if that’s their preference, so be it!

The answer here is very simple:  If you are a low-cost service provider, be the best one in your market.  If, on the other hand, you wish to be something other than low-cost, make sure that like Mercedes, BMW, Nobu, Gucci, and other fine products and service providers, you provide your clients with such incredibly valuable services, experiences, and outcomes, that your other-than-low-price will be warranted and you will be in demand!

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation

Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to financial and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew B. Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America. By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com.

Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say
AndrewZezas.com

For additional profiles, pictures, and more click here or go to http://realstratnews.wordpress.com/media-information/.

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011. All Rights Reserved.

###

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Has Your Wife Inspected the Building Yet?

In a recent industrial lease transaction, how the deal came to a close was not only unusual, but very telling about the direction of the current economy.  A privately held company negotiated with a commercial landlord to occupy a full building in a prominent and well-located industrial park in central New Jersey.   The landlord had an excellent reputation for quality designed and solidly constructed buildings, for maintaining high service levels, and for sticking to his word.  However, the landlord’s buildings were also known to be priced higher than his competition.

The landlord, a very astute and respected business man, had recently gotten very aggressive in lowering rents in an effort to attract more tenants and fill his buildings’ vacancies.  Nonetheless, his rents were still higher than many of his competitors.

In this particular negotiation, the landlord offered extremely flexible terms and an annual rental rate that was one of the lowest he had offered in the last eight years.  After weeks of back and forth, the tenant’s CEO informed the landlord that the company would not accept his terms, and that the company decided to lease a building of similar quality located twenty minutes further south.  The CEO said that the building they had chosen was less expensive, and that given current economic challenges, the spread between rents for the two buildings was significant enough that he could not pass up the additional savings.  He told the landlord that his company made its decision a week earlier and that its lawyers were already deep into lease document negotiations.  The CEO was a candid guy, so the landlord took him at face value and correctly assumed this was not a negotiating ploy.

Disappointed for having worked so hard to land the tenant, the landlord knew he couldn’t win them all.  The landlord confirmed for the CEO that he had truly offered all he could, and wished the tenant well.  The CEO stated that even if the landlord had offered more, he did not expect the central New Jersey building to be able to match the lower rents at the selected building.  So, they parted, saying they each hoped to do business together again some.

That weekend, the CEO was driving through central New Jersey with his wife on his way to a social function.  Since his wife had heard so much from him about the intense building negotiations, the CEO decided to drive her past the two buildings, both the one to which the company planned to relocate and the central New Jersey building he’d decided not to lease.

After driving around the central New Jersey building and sitting in front for a few moments, the wife, who rarely involved herself in her husband’s business affairs, told her CEO husband that he was nuts for passing-up the central New Jersey building.  She told him that she thought he’d made a mistake, and that the building offered an image that was far more impressive than anything else she’d seen.  From what the CEO told her, the central New Jersey building offered a giant leap in functional design, in comparison to the company’s current facility and the one the CEO selected.  She said that the building he had chosen could not compare, that his company would have benefited considerably more by moving its employees and operations to the central New Jersey building, and that the company would likely have become more profitable and able to significantly elevate its own image had it chosen the central New Jersey building.  Wow!

The CEO’s wife was right, and he was convinced!  First thing Monday morning, the CEO called the central New Jersey landlord and agreed to close the deal, despite the additional rental cost for the central New Jersey building.  The CEO realized that given the terms offered by the landlord, he would basically get a BMW quality building for the price of a Chevy.  He knew that, despite the continued economic doom and gloom heralded by the media, a good deal would still be a good deal.  Moreover, the CEO, obviously an intelligent business man, recognized that the lowest cost deal, even if it is less than the cost of a Chevy, while often attractive, is not always the best deal.  He understood that value could be derived, and success could be achieved, in multiple ways, other than through mere cost reduction.

When companies begin to return to rational thought, as in the case above, a circumstance that has lately been repeated again and again, you can be assured that such activities are the true signs that the recovery is gaining traction.  And, when your wife tells you that your company would be better off by taking a particular action, you may want to listen closely.

What unusual circumstances have surrounded your projects?

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation

Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to financial and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew B. Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America. By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com.

Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say
AndrewZezas.com

For additional profiles, pictures, and more click here or go to http://realstratnews.wordpress.com/media-information/.

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011. All Rights Reserved.

###

Instincts and Communication Win the Day!

A broker friend of mine from the Chicago area recently had a client who was incredibly busy, often too immersed in growing its business to fully focus on its real estate project, even though the client knew that its real estate project was important to its continued success.

Throw in a few everyday business challenges, a horrible economy, and a couple of summer vacations, and you can imagine how tough it might have been for this very attentive and experienced broker to keep his client’s real estate project on track.

As the broker strove to build momentum in the transaction, the client wasn’t making important decisions and milestones weren’t being achieved.  This took place while the project was still in its early stages and even though the client confirmed its desire to complete a deal.

The broker struggled to understand why, after being in the business for over two decades and after advising hundreds of clients, he couldn’t corral this one single client and move this project forward. So many questions entered his mind, including:

  • Was the client still just too busy?
  • Were they having second thoughts about proceeding with the project?
  • Had something drastic happened in their business?
  • Was the client’s company being acquired?
  • Were they being sued?
  • Were they talking to other real estate service providers?
  • Had they succumbed to the landlord’s constant attempts to deal with them directly, in order to disintermediate the broker and increase its own profits?

The broker went over and over all of the various reasons why he couldn’t bring his client’s project forward, struggling to understand why.  He reminded himself of the rock solid representation agreement between he and his client, so he wasn’t concerned about other brokers or even the landlord getting in his way. But, what could it be that was keeping this deal stuck in the mud?

And, then it happened…the “aha!” moment. The broker instincts kicked-in when he realized that the executives with whom he was dealing had little experience in completing real estate transactions.  What if they didn’t understand how something, a deal component perhaps, is supposed to work?  What if they misunderstood some of his guidance?  What if they were concerned about risk, excessive costs, or other terms that, because of their inexperience in commercial real estate, they misinterpreted as becoming their burden?  What if they were unaware about how the broker would deal with some or all of those issues, which obligations they’d have to bear, and which would fall to the landlord?  What if, because their project’s foundational objectives were cost containment and reduction, they thought the project would be too expensive because they misinterpreted the details? What if, like too many seasoned and accomplished executives the broker had dealt with in the past, these executives were too embarrassed to say they didn’t understand or were to egocentric to admit that they didn’t know how a real estate project was supposed to work? What if? What if? What if?

Wow! Could it really be that simple! Could it be that the stalling, the delays, the inactivity, and the complete lack of momentum resulted only from simple miscommunication or misunderstanding?

The broker trusted his instincts and called his client. His opening line was: “I’d like to review how the landlord will probably bear most of the financial burden and risk in your proposed transaction.” Was he ever right on target! Despite the detailed written report the broker provided his client that explained how the transaction would be structured, his client incorrectly thought it would have to bear most of the financial burden. And, the senior executive, a bright and intelligent guy, was too embarrassed to ask. Go figure!

Guess what? The project is moving forward now at an appropriate pace. The broker expects to wrap-up a deal shortly that will greatly reduce his client’s costs and improve its operating efficiency, thereby exceeding the client’s original objectives. And, the client will bear few, if any, transaction costs.

It wasn’t the terms or the broker that held-up the deal. It was simply human nature, a missed communication by the client, a a little bit of ego that was getting in the way. Strong instincts, experience, and proactive communications often win the day, and go a long way in successfully advising tenant clients!  In this case, that’s exactly what they did!

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation

Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to financial and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew B. Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America. By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com.

Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say
AndrewZezas.com

For additional profiles, pictures, and more click here or go to http://realstratnews.wordpress.com/media-information/.

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011. All Rights Reserved.

###

Want to Know More About Customer Service? Rent a Car!

How many commercial landlords incorrectly consider themselves to be in the real estate business?  How many real estate brokers assume they’re in the business of leasing or selling properties?  They’re all wrong!  From a customer service perspective, both parts of the commercial real estate industry could take direction from the car rental business!

Recently, I flew to Oklahoma on business.  Prior to my flight, I arranged for a rental car to be available.  Since I had combined two business trips into one, I flew in from another city that required indirect flights.  So, after traveling all day long, when I finally landed late that night, the last thing I wanted was anything more that would keep me from getting some sleep.

As I got off the place, I walked through the terminal and arrived at the car rental area.  When I approached the car rental counter, I found a young man sitting behind the desk quietly with a smile on his face.  It was almost midnight, so the car rental area, and the airport itself, were both pretty quiet.  I dropped my bags and said: “I’m Andrew Zezas…I believe you have a car waiting for me?”  The smiley service representative stood up, said: “Good evening, Mr. Zezas. Your car is ready!”  He proceeded to give me very precise directions to the elevator that would take me to my car.  I picked up my bags, followed his directions, and when the elevators opened, I stepped off and saw the their booth just a few step in front of me.  I walked up to the booth and opened my mouth to speak, when the attendant said: “You must be Mr. Zezas!  Your car is right here.”  13 feet away from where I was standing was a just cleaned sparkling sedan with the engine idling, ready to take me to my hotel.  The attendant handed me my paperwork, and in what seemed like little more than 30 second, my bags were in the trunk, I met up with my colleague, and we were driving out of the airport.  How cool was that?  Sleep was only a short drive away!

Before I pulled off the airport property, a sensor on the dashboard told me that pressure in one of the tires was very low.  So, my colleague and I immediately returned to the rental booth.  I figured, sleep might have to wait a while.  The attendant saw us pull in and, before he even knew what the problem was, he couldn’t apologize enough.  He asked me how he could make up to us the terrible inconvenience his company had caused us.  Was he kidding?  Terrible inconvenience?  We drove for all of 87 seconds!  What terrible inconvenience?  This guy really meant it!  He couldn’t stop apologizing.

The attendant walked into his booth, and in under 3 minutes came out with keys to a brand spankin’ new SUV.  He said: “We’ve upgraded you two levels, as our way of apologizing.  Your car is right over there”.   Wow!  I walked over to the SUV, threw my bags in the back, and was overwhelmed with that new car smell that I can never get enough of.  When my colleague and I looked down at the dash, we both saw something neither of us had ever seen before.  Now, mind you, we each have been driving for more than 30 years.  What we saw amazed us.  The odometer read….3!  Not 300, not 3,000….just 3, little old miles.  This shiny, wonderful smelling, free upgraded SUV, had only been driven out of the factory, onto the trailer, and into the rental parking lot.  It had basically never been driven by anyone else other than the guys who built it and delivered it.  And, I would be the first!  Now, that was cool!

So, let’s count the surprises:

1. Smiley greeting at the counter

2. Greeting at the booth, which ws easy to find and close by

3. Car waiting next to the booth

4. 10 or 20 apologies

5. Under 3 minute car replacement

6. Free upgrade to a much larger and more comfortable vehicle

7. And, a vehicle that, if it was any newer, it would still be still steel ingots and petroleum!

Now, that’s what I call customer service!  You think I’ll rent from that company again?  You think I’ve told this story a bunch of times, and have encouraged my colleagues, clients, family, and friends to rent from them?  You think word of mouth travels fast?  You bet!

Landlords and brokers, errors happen in transactions and when providing service all the time.  Some are simple, honest mistakes, and others are major screw-ups, or worse.  When was the last time you provided seven surprises as a way of making your tenants and clients feel like they wouldn’t want to do business with anyone else ever again?

Send me your thoughts.

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation

Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to financial and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew B. Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America. By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com.

Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say
AndrewZezas.com

For additional profiles, pictures, and more click here or go to http://realstratnews.wordpress.com/media-information/.

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011. All Rights Reserved.

###


Do Corporate Tenant Real Estate Advisors Go Too Far?

Do corporate tenant real estate advisors go too far?  Some landlords think that those real estate professionals who advise corporate tenants, often over-negotiate lease transactions on behalf of their tenants.

Is this just sour grapes? Is it  because landlords don’t like negotiating with tenant advisors who understand the commercial real estate game and put money back into the pockets of their corporate tenant clients?  Is this because landlords don’t like the idea of paying commissions to tenant advisors who negotiate against them? Or, is there truth to this…that corporate tenant real estate advisors really do go too far when negotiating leases for their clients?

What is going too far, really?  Is it too far when a tenant seeks more than a landlord would prefer to give…more free rent, rent discounts, construction allowances, flexibility, options and rights, favorable terms, or otherwise?  Is it too far when a tenant directs its advisor to negotiate certain terms the landlord may not like?  Is it too far when a tenant advisor does all he / she can to achieve the best terms for his / her client?

When landlords feel that tenant advisors go too far, could this really be more a matter of market conditions?  If a landlord’s competitors will not support the terms a tenant seeks, can that tenant realistically expect to achieve such goals? Not likely.

I’ve heard some landlords complain that tenant advisors unfairly fill the heads of executives with the idea that corporate tenants are entitled to all kinds of goodies when negotiating leases.  They often say that this practice is unreasonable, as it makes negotiations difficult for landlords.

Note to commercial landlords: The role of tenant advisors is not to make transactions easy for landlords…nor, is it to make transactions difficult for landlords.  In fact, the tenant advisor’s role is to enhance and protect the interests of its corporate tenant clients by understanding their business objectives and to recommend transaction strategies and structures that would support them.  The tenant advisor’s role is also to negotiate aggressively to secure as much for the tenant as possible.  Seasoned tenant advisors understand the limits after which they might put their transactional opponent landlords in danger or even jeopardize a transaction.

Just like how the role of landlord advisors is to work to benefit landlords, the job of the tenant advisor is clearly defined.  When a tenant advisor makes demands that a landlord finds too great, perhaps it simply means that the particular transaction just isn’t right for that landlord.

At times when supply is low and demand is high…in markets that are favorable to landlords, do tenant advisors still go too far?  In those markets, I rarely hear such complaints.  When the odds are stacked in favor of landlords, how far would be too far for “landlord” brokers to go?

Do some corporate tenant advisors go too far? I’ll answer that question this way:  Is this really an indictment of all tenant advisors?  Do some landlords and landlord brokers go too far?

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation

Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to financial and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew B. Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America. By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com.

Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say
AndrewZezas.com

For additional profiles, pictures, and more click here or go to http://realstratnews.wordpress.com/media-information/.

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011. All Rights Reserved.

###

One Page Tenant Representation Agreements Are Useless!

First of all, “Tenant Rep” is simply an incorrect term.  Read about that!

One page commercial occupant representation agreements don’t protect clients or real estate professionals.  They may actually be dangerous!

A commercial occupant representation agreement is intended to reflect the nature of the business relationship between the client (the commercial occupant) and its service provider.   A well-written agreement clarifies the roles, rights, and responsibilities of both parties, and should protect them both.

Commercial Occupant Representation Agreements should clearly define:

  • Who the real estate professional represents
  • The term of the agreement
  • Commencement and expiration dates
  • Services to be performed
  • Events that must occur for the real estate professional to be entitled to compensation
  • The amount the real estate professional will be paid, and by whom
  • A statement about how the receipt of commission by the real estate professional from the landlord will not be viewed as a conflict-of-interest by the client
  • A mechanism for identifying and resolving conflicts-of-interest
  • A provision to extend the agreement
  • Obligations of both parties on termination and post-termination
  • Default, cure, and termination provisions
  • Authorization for the real estate professional to deal with the client’s other service providers
  • Statement that the agreement is governed by the laws and courts of the appropriate state
  • Statement that the parties to the agreement are authorized to enter into it
  • Entire agreement, no amendments except in writing
  • And, don’t forget all that other legal text that’s typically associated with service agreements that, while often lengthy, is intended to protect both client and service provider.

*** The above is not intended to represent a comprehensive list, nor am I practicing law by providing it.  Consult an attorney before drafting or executing an contract or agreement.

Since there exist more issues that are not reflected above, how the heck can you get all that is necessary onto a single page and make it an effective agreement for you and your client?

For your sake, and that of your client, hire an experienced commercial real estate attorney to draft a great document that protects you and your clients, learn how to present it effectively to your prospective clients, and then go make incredible deals for them!

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation
Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to finance and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing of, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America.  By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com. Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011.  All Rights Reserved.

###

Tenant Representative…Is that really the correct name for what I do?

Tenant Representative…Is that really the correct name for what I do?

For years I’ve been called a tenant representative.  That’s a prevalent term used by many in commercial real estate.  Tenant representatives are most often defined as real estate professionals, advisors, and brokers, who only represent the real estate interests of commercial tenants.  Full-time tenant representatives don’t typically represent landlords or others who are in the business of real estate. Tenant representatives prefer to remain on one side of the transactional equation, most often for the purpose of transparently representing the interests of their commercial clients, so as to minimize the probability that they might become embroiled in a conflict-of-interest.

Some full-service real estate professionals, those who offer services to tenants, landlords, investors, developers, buyers, sellers, sublandlords, subtenants, and others, claim to provide tenant representation as one of their often very large bundles of service offerings.

When it comes to avoiding conflicts of interest, I’m not quite sure how full-service real estate professionals can truly be transparent and protect their clients.  The myth of the existence of so called “Chinese Walls” in real estate brokerage companies is a total joke.  I’ve never seen one such company that keeps tenant representatives in a separate building from their landlord brokers, or one that maintains separate databases not accessible by the other side.  In fact, in most states, the senior real estate licensee of the company is responsible for all transactions completed by that company.  So, how can one individual be responsible for both tenant representation and full service engagements while, at the same time, remaining transparent and balanced, and avoiding conflicts-of-interest for the company’s clients?  But, that’s an entirely different story!

The issue here is whether or not the term “Tenant Representative” is accurate.  The word “Tenant” refers to a lease by an occupant for property owned by a landlord. Many companies consider leasing vs buying.  With recent prices for commercial real estate as low as they have been lately, many companies are asking if they show own or lease.  Furthermore, if changes in lease accounting rules  proposed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the International Accounting Standards Board are passed (many expect those rules will be passed), the financial reporting differences between leasing and owning will almost be eliminated. So, even more companies will likely consider ownership over leasing in the near term.

Considering that the role of a real estate professional is to advise his or her clients about opportunities to achieve their real estate and business objectives, don’t most tenant representatives help their clients compare leasing to owning real estate?  And, don’t some of those clients purchase real estate instead of leasing?  When a company owns real estate, are they a tenant?  So, does the term “Tenant Representative” accurately apply?

Introducing….”Commercial Occupant Representatives”…at your service!  Does that work?

About Real Estate Strategies Corporation
Real Estate Strategies Corporation is a respected corporate advisory and transaction services firm that provides thought-leadership, decision-making, planning, project management, and transaction execution services to finance and senior executives at management team-led public, private, and portfolio companies, and not-for-profit organizations.  Under the leadership of its award-winning CEO, Andrew Zezas, RealStrat’s clients engage the firm when acquiring, disposing of, renegotiating, or enhancing occupied leased or owned real estate in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, and throughout North America.  By creating and executing Business DRIVEN Real Estate Solutions and identifying hidden Opportunities, RealStrat drives greater operational and financial performance in support of its clients’ stakeholder objectives, M&A requirements, and exit strategies.

In the current economic environment, RealStrat’s efforts are focused on uncovering, capturing, and re-purposing hidden liquidity and minimizing risk in its clients’ leased and owned real estate.  The firm provides counsel as to competitive advantage strategies in preparation for the eventual economic recovery.  Visit www.RealStrat.com. Read about timely commercial real estate issues at RealStrat’s blog at www.CorporateAdvisor.wordpress.com. Follow RealStrat at http://www.Twitter.com/RealStrat.

LINKS:

RealStrat News
Biographies
Articles
Properties
What Our Clients Say

Copyright Real Estate Strategies Corporation 2011.  All Rights Reserved.

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THIS WORK IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE PRACTICAL AND USEFUL INFORMATION ON THE SUBJECT MATTER COVERED AND REPRESENTS THE OPINION OF THE AUTHOR. HOWEVER, IT IS PROVIDED WITH THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THE AUTHOR IS NOT ENGAGED IN RENDERING LEGAL, FINANCIAL, ACCOUNTING, OR OTHER PROFESSIONAL ADVICE TO THE READER. IF LEGAL, FINANCIAL, ACCOUNTING, OR OTHER PROFESSIONAL ADVICE IS REQUIRED, THE SERVICES OF A COMPETENT PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE SOUGHT. THE AUTHOR SPECIFICALLY AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY THAT MAY BE INCURRED AS A RESULT OF THE USE OR APPLICATION OF THE INFORMATION THAT IS CONTAINED IN THIS WORK.